News

Preliminary Notes on Two Recently Discovered Inscriptions from La Corona, Guatemala

La Corona Element

Archaeologists with the La Corona Regional Archaeological Project in Guatemala announced significant hieroglyphic finds during a press conference at the National Palace in Guatemala City.  Dr. David Stuart is La Corona Project main epigrapher, where the maya monument was unearth. Read Dr. Stuart article on the findings.

Notes on the recently discovered inscriptions in Guatemala.

Submit papers for The 2016 Maya Meetings

Dos Pilas

 

The 2016 Maya Meetings ( January 12-16, 2016) will explore the archaeology and history of the lower Río Pasión region, focusing on the sites of Seibal, Dos Pilas, Aguateca and others.

Research over several decades has shown this distinctive area as a key “hot spot” of turmoil during the Classic period – an area of conflict, alliance-building, and ever-changing political structure. No previous large conference has ever focused on this important area, so the presentations and discussions will be break new ground, weaving together information form archaeological projects old and new.

Following our new format, The Maya Meetings symposium now devotes time to our special theme and a will also devote time to papers touching on all aspects of Maya archaeology, culture and history. We invite submissions from anyone who is interested in presenting.

Submission Page

New releases from UT Press

book releases cover

Summer is sizzling! Check out the new and upcoming releases from The University of Texas Press. Great books to make summer a breeze!

 

 

New Archaeological Discoveries in Guatemala

David Stuart on the field

In May Prof. David Stuart conducted fieldwork at two archaeological sites in northern Guatemala, helping to document important Maya monuments and sculptures discovered by colleagues from Tulane University.

New Publication Initiative at the Mesoamerican Center

New Publicatio cover

The Mesoamerica Center is excited to be involved in the production of two important monograph series in the fields of ancient American archaeology and art history, Ancient America and Research Reports on Ancient Maya Writing. Both publications have a long and venerable history in Mesoamerican studies, and have been the source of a number of path-breaking works over the past three decades. Appearing this summer is Ancient America 13, The Fall of the Great Celestial Bird: A Master Myth in Early Classic Central Mexico by Jesper Nielsen and Christophe Helmke, both of the University of Copenhagen. 

 

The Mesoamerica Center receives support from Ruta Maya Coffee

Ruta Maya Coffee
 

The Mesoamerica Center housed in the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin is proud to announce a new partnership with Ruta Maya Coffee.

“The Maya Meetings and Ruta Maya Coffee are two Austin institutions with strong ties in the Maya world. It’s wonderful to have us working together to promote scholarship, learning and sustainability in the region,” said David Stuart, director of The Mesoamerica center and the Linda and David Schele Chair in the Art and Writing of Mesoamerica.

Ruta Maya Coffee will be partially underwriting the Maya Meetings and programs at Casa Herrera.

"We are very proud to be involved with the Mesoamerica Center at The University of Texas at Austin and to participate in The Maya Meetings and Casa Herrera. We are excited about all the possibilities as well as the bridges to be built between the Mayan Farmer Coops and the Mesoamerica Center" said Tim Sheehan, President of Ruta Maya Coffee.

Travel Report: Within Tikal's Reach

Dr. Astrid Runggaldier on the field
 

This summer a small team, led by Dr. Astrid Runggaldier, set out on a Mesoamerica Center expedition. The group visited several sites in the Tikal region and wanted to locate the settlement of El Zapote, first reported by Ian Graham in 1974.

This pilot study was funded by a research grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation through UT’s Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies. Its aims were to ground-check the best location and potential for developing a long-term project, provide training and research opportunities for graduate students, and enrich undergraduate courses at UT with original research.

This region has contributed important recent discoveries and developments in Preclassic and Early Classic studies as well as demonstrates the interaction between Maya and Central Mexican peoples.

From the Archives


 

In 1978, this 56-page booklet, the original “notebook” for the Maya Hieroglyphic Writing Workshop at Texas, was handed out to all participants and contained Linda Schele’s detailed transcriptions of selected hieroglyphic tablets from Palenque, Mexico.

This initial gathering, held over a chilly spring break in Austin, was the distant ancestor of the current Maya Meetings and has been held annually ever since.