The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan

The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan exhibition

The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan is a pictographic painting on cotton cloth, created circa 1530. The Lienzo is considered the first map of Guatemala.

Learn more about the exhibition

Maya Meetings

Highlighted News and Events

Travel Report: Within Tikal's Reach

Dr. Astrid Runggaldier on the field
 

This summer a small team, led by Dr. Astrid Runggaldier, set out on a Mesoamerica Center expedition. The group visited several sites in the Tikal region and wanted to locate the settlement of El Zapote, first reported by Ian Graham in 1974.

This pilot study was funded by a research grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation through UT’s Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies. Its aims were to ground-check the best location and potential for developing a long-term project, provide training and research opportunities for graduate students, and enrich undergraduate courses at UT with original research.

This region has contributed important recent discoveries and developments in Preclassic and Early Classic studies as well as demonstrates the interaction between Maya and Central Mexican peoples.

From the Archives


 

In 1978, this 56-page booklet, the original “notebook” for the Maya Hieroglyphic Writing Workshop at Texas, was handed out to all participants and contained Linda Schele’s detailed transcriptions of selected hieroglyphic tablets from Palenque, Mexico.

This initial gathering, held over a chilly spring break in Austin, was the distant ancestor of the current Maya Meetings and has been held annually ever since. 

 

 

Lienzo de Quauhquechollan Exhibition

Lienzo de Quauhquecholla

The Mesoamerica Center is proud to present 
The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan Exhibition.

The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan is a pictographic painting on cotton cloth, created circa 1530. The Lienzo is considered the first map of Guatemala.

The Lienzo is also the only firsthand indigenous account of the conquest of Guatemala, and one of the few sources to record the military campaigns of Jorge de Alvarado in 1527–1530. The exhibit of the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan brings to life this untold story of Guatemala's conquest. 

The exhibition coincides with the 2013 Maya Meetings and will be on display until March 2013.