Mesoamerica Center

Highlighted News and Events

Submit papers for The 2016 Maya Meetings

Dos Pilas

 

The 2016 Maya Meetings ( January 12-16, 2016) will explore the archaeology and history of the lower Río Pasión refion, focusing on istes of seibal, Dos Pilas, Aguateca and others.

Research over several decades has shown this distinctive area to this was a key “hot spot” of turmoil during the Classic period – an area of conflict, alliance-building, and ever-changing political structure. No previous large conference has ever focused on this important area, so the presentations and discussions will be break new ground, weaving together information form archaeological projects old and new.

Following our new format, The Maya Meetings symposium now devotes one day to our special theme and a second day to shorter papers touching on all aspects of Maya archaeology, culture and history. We invite submissions from anyone who is interested in presenting.

Submission Page

New releases from UT Press

UT press logo

Summer is sizzling! Check out the new and upcoming releases from The University of Texas Press. Great books to make summer a breeze!

 

New Archaeological Discoveries in Guatemala

David Stuart on the field

In May Prof. David Stuart conducted fieldwork at two archaeological sites in northern Guatemala, helping to document important Maya monuments and sculptures discovered by colleagues from Tulane University.

Dr. David Stuart at The Pre-Columbian Society of Washington, D.C

David Stuart

The Pre-Columbian Society of Washington, D.C will host Dr. David Stuart for their June feature event. His talk will present a new look at the famous triadic temples of Palenque, Mexico, known as the Cross Group. Using an integrated approach to the architectural complex, Dr. Stuart aims to show how its hieroglyphic inscriptions and iconography worked together to present a tightly interwoven narrative that bridges mythology and history, highlighting the status and ceremonial power of king K’inch Kan Bahlam, who dedicated the shrine complex early in his reign in 682 A.D.

More information

New Fire: University of Texas at Austin's Blog on Mesoamerica News and Research

Blog

New Fire is a blog produced by The Mesoamerica Center on current Mesoamerican art and archaeology. This blog will present current archaeology news, projects by graduate students at UT-Austin, and information about resources and projects at the Mesoamerican Center.

The editors of this blog include Elliot Lopez-Finn and Stephanie Strauss, as well as other contributing members of MaGSA, the organization of students at UT-Austin that study Pre-Columbian culture.

Study Abroad: Spring Semester in Guatemala and Belize

 


San Pedro las Huertas

This spring, The Mesoamerica Center brought students to Casa Herrera for their study abroad semester for the third year. This satellite campus provides a teaching and research center in the colonial city of Antigua, Guatemala.

The study abroad program is open to all majors and focuses on ancient and contemporary culture in Guatemala and Belize, giving students a fully immersive and interactive experience at ancient Maya sites, national and local museums, archaeological laboratories, and contemporary Maya villages.

The Mesoamerica Center faculty lead for the program, Dr. Astrid Runggaldier, teaches courses in Antigua and oversees the curriculum, field trips, invited speakers, and special projects.

 

From the Archives


 

In 1978, this 56-page booklet, the original “notebook” for the Maya Hieroglyphic Writing Workshop at Texas, was handed out to all participants and contained Linda Schele’s detailed transcriptions of selected hieroglyphic tablets from Palenque, Mexico.

This initial gathering, held over a chilly spring break in Austin, was the distant ancestor of the current Maya Meetings and has been held annually ever since. 

 

 

IHOPE-MAYA Workshop

IHOPE ( Integrated History and Future of People on Earth) is a global network of researchers and research projects using integrative frameworks to combine study human and Earth system history on behalf of our species’ future. IHOPE’s long-term, human-scale perspective unites Earth system science with the social sciences, the humanities, and communities of practice. The IHOPE project office is hosted by Uppsala University in Sweden.

Remote tunnel exploration beneath Temple of the Feathered Serpent

Photo of tunnel

Some recent reporting on robots and archaeological exploration at Teotihuacan:

Lienzo de Quauhquechollan Exhibition

Lienzo de Quauhquecholla

The Mesoamerica Center is proud to present 
The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan Exhibition.

The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan is a pictographic painting on cotton cloth, created circa 1530. The Lienzo is considered the first map of Guatemala.

The Lienzo is also the only firsthand indigenous account of the conquest of Guatemala, and one of the few sources to record the military campaigns of Jorge de Alvarado in 1527–1530. The exhibit of the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan brings to life this untold story of Guatemala's conquest. 

The exhibition coincides with the 2013 Maya Meetings and will be on display until March 2013.

Major Discovery: Tomb of Lady K'abel

The burial chambers of Lady K'abel have been discovered at the site of El Perú-Waka' beneath the staircase leading to the summit of Structure M13-1.

Major Discovery: Cueva Rey Condoy

A recently discovered cave in the Oaxaca Valley contains several new and exciting examples of Zapotec visual culture, including wonderful over-life-size mud sculptures of human and supernatural figures, rock paintings, and lithics.

Research Reports on Ancient Maya Writing

The Research Reports on Ancient Maya Writing issues number 61, 62, and 63 are now available for download at the University of Texas Digital Repository!

Texas Notes @ the UT Digital Repository

Texas Notes logo

All available entries in the Texas Notes on Precolumbian Art series are now online and available for download at the University of Texas Digital Repository.

Apocalypse later

Image of cover book The Order of Days

Dr. David Stuart is feature on The Boston Globe. Dr. Stuart demystifies the 2012 phenomenon in a very interesting Q&A.